Jonny + Jane West

Horse Games for Girls

Horse games for girls are easy to find. It is obviously a much sought after commodity.

 Horse Games for Girls

Which style interests you?

I searched on Amazon and quickly found that they offer a wide variety of horse games for girls of all ages.  I am not sure what you’re looking for.

Weather it’s electronics, dolls or a board game, let me share some ideas, experiences and thoughts that I have.

When I was a kid I had Johnny West and Thunderbolt.

Horse Games for Girls

Johnny + Jane West

My cousin Tilly and I would play for hours in the back yard.

I was the youngest of six, properly spoiled and pretty much always got what I wanted.

Of course that was back in 1965 and things have changed a little bit since then.

Now the action figures you will find include Breyer Classics Chelsea Show Jumper, Breyer Let’s Go Riding Western among others.

Breyer Classics Chelsea Show Jumper

Breyer Classics Chelsea Show Jumper

If board games are what you were looking for, then please check out  Fantasy Stables: Regular Edition Board Game

I enjoyed the fact that they had a lot of customer reviews. After reading them I noticed that bad reviews were quickly responded to by the manufacturer’s representative.
4.3 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews

Below in orange I’ve included the companies comments on what age is appropriate to play this game.

Fantasy Horse Stables

Fantasy Horse Stables

We usually recommend the game for ages 13+. We’ve definitely sold the game to younger kids on occasion (and heard later that they absolutely love it) but it’s usually a super horsey kid that rides/shows or plays a lot of other adult board games. We have a Junior Edition of the game that’s perfect for younger kids and pre-teens and is also fun for parents/older siblings to play with them as well. Usually if people are on the fence about which version is the right choice (Junior vs Regular) we always recommend the Junior.

I hope that I have helped you along your way. Remember that electronic and board games are usually played indoors.

They also make a good rainy day or night time endeavor, alone or with friends.

Blankets, How and What

Please read my post Horse Blankets For Newbies .

That post is a beginners introduction to my personal experience with horse blankets.

Let me spend a little bit of time sharing How.

First let me help you take a blanket off.

Warning, don’t do this alone your first time.

Have your trainer show you, then watch you, until you are confident.

Once you have your horse standing securely on cross ties undo his surcingles.

Tuffrider Fly Sheet

Tuffrider Fly Sheet

A blanket usually has two. Let them hang. Check his back side to make sure nothing is wrapped around the tail.

Now go to his front and look at his chest. There should be one or two buckles that need to be removed.

Once these are loose you can now remove the blanket.

Stand on the side, spread out your arms, grab the front and as far back as you can and lift the blanket off.

As you slowly pull the blanket off, slide it towards the rear of the horse. When doing this make sure nothing is pulling or caught on the horse.

You can then fold it, hang it up or place it where it belongs. Sometimes the horse blankets will get placed on the aisle floor when removed.

If this is the practice at the barn you are riding at, make sure it is placed safely against wall. You don’t want to leave anything hanging in the way for horses or people to step on or trip over.

After a while you will soon learn about all the different blankets that are available. Some of them are listed below.

There is a winter blanket, a sheet, a cooler, anti-sweat. That is to just name a few.

Some horses have a turnout blanket. You can get sheets for horse shows.

Rambo Cooler

Rambo Cooler

They come with monograms and custom colors.

The choices you have are endless.

I will have further updates with more information on blankets in further posts.

Terminology

Basic Terminology – Learn all about the basic words you hear every day at a horse farm. Mare, Gaits, Tack, Stallion, Sound, Lunge, Filly, Foal, Pony…etc.

It’s important for you to learn the basic nomenclature of the sport that you are about to begin.

When you first show up on the farm it may seem like they are speaking in a foreign language.

Don’t let this intimidate you, or be afraid to ask any questions on some words or terms that you may not understand.

Every sport has their own language and horseback riding is not any different.

A gelding is a male horse that has been castrated. A stud still has all his parts. A mare is a female horse.

Always be careful around any horse but I recommend you do not spend time alone with any studs.

Baby horses have thier own list of names.

A Filly is a female baby, a Colt is a male baby, a Foal is a baby horse, male or female. They are all usually under one years old.

A pony is a term used for a small horse, there are many different breeds of ponies.

Gaits is another term you will be subjected to. At a horse farm they’re referring to the manner in which a horse is moving.

Some gaits that horses will use are walking, trotting, cantering to name a few.

Tack is the equipment that is used when you ride.  The saddle, bridle and girth are all part of the horses Tack.

There are over 350 horse breeds in the world today.

Thoroughbred, Quarter Horse, Arabian, Morgan and Paint are just a few of the names you will probably hear.

I hope this partial list of terms will help you to begin to understand what you are hearing at a horse farm.